John Lawson’s Explorations of the Catawba Path, 1700-1701

The Catawba Path is traveled in part today by anyone who uses Broad Street in Camden, where appropriately the weathervane effigy of Catawba chief "King Haiglar" tops the historic town tower. (Image from mid-1900s)

The Catawba Path is traveled in part today by anyone who uses Broad Street in Camden, where appropriately the weathervane effigy of Catawba chief “King Haiglar” tops the historic town tower. (Image from mid-1900s)

A very interested audience of 50 to 60 at the Robert Mills Courthouse  May 19,2008, heard Val Green discuss his extensive research.

The Catawba Path is traveled in part today by anyone who uses Broad Street in Camden, where appropriately the weathervane effigy of Catawba chief “King Haiglar” tops the historic town tower. (Image from mid-1900s)

The Catawba Trading Path

An environmental engineer and graduate of Clemson University, Val Green has spent many years researching the topic of his May 18,2008, lecture at the Robert Mills Courthouse in Camden– John Lawson’s Explorations of the Catawba Trading Path.

Part of Green’s research involved physically locating the path that the English explorer traveled in the early 1700s through the backcountry wilderness that included present Kershaw County.

A few days after Green’s descriptive lecture, Society president Peggy Ogburn followed the modern footprints of this trail and submitted the following views traveling from northward to southward through present Kershaw County: (1) a Flat Rock Road section, (2) South Broad Street in Camden, with the Historic Camden Revolutionary Park entrance to the left, and (3) a few miles south of Camden where an unpaved section of the historic path lies on private property.

(1) a Flat Rock Road section,

(1) a Flat Rock Road section,

(2) South Broad Street in Camden, with the Historic Camden Revolutionary Park entrance to the left, and

(2) South Broad Street in Camden, with the Historic Camden Revolutionary Park entrance to the left, and

(3) a few miles south of Camden where an unpaved section of the historic path lies on private property.

(3) a few miles south of Camden where an unpaved section of the historic path lies on private property.

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